Grandpa Joe's Eggs

Saturday, December 29, 2007

My grandpa Joe was born in Philadelphia in 1907. He left home at 16 and joined the merchant marines which must be how he got to Rotterdam where this photograph was taken in April of 1927 (the Dutch girl is not my grandmother - they met much later in life.)

Joe Fox (my Grandpa Joe) with a friend in Rotterdam, April 9, 1927 copyright 2015, the Garden of Eating

Although Joe lacked formal education, he had a "great native intelligence" according to my grandmother. He could take apart or put together any kind of machine, system or gadget. He made his living setting up textile mills which meant that my mom had to move often as a child.

Hard-boiled eggs by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

I never met my Grandpa Joe - he died many years before I was born - but he was often present in our house at breakfast time when my mom made "Grandpa Joe's eggs" for my brother and me. It was, and still is, one of my favorite ways to greet the morn. I've been surprised by the extent to which it pleases me that both of my boys love it, too.

Hand holding an egg by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

His creation is simple, hearty, and delicious--soft-boiled eggs broken over torn up pieces of buttered toast and seasoned liberally with salt and pepper. I always added plenty of dill to my bowl of Grandpa Joe's eggs, too. I was practically addicted to dried dill as a kid -- my mom would watch me pouring it on and jokingly ask if I'd like some eggs with my dill.

Fresh dill by Liz Mochrie via Flickr, copyright 2014. https://www.flickr.com/photos/lizziemoch/13961980618/

I still make Grandpa Joe's eggs when I feel like having something cozy and comforting for breakfast and I still like them best with a little dill (though I've switched from dried to fresh). Don't skimp on the butter.

Grandpa Joe's eggs by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

-- print recipe --Grandpa Joe's Eggs
Makes 1 serving

Ingredients

* 1-2 eggs (I suggest getting pasture-raised eggs, preferably from a hen near you)
* 2 pieces of bread (preferably white bread or English muffin)
* Sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
* A few sprigs of fresh dill, chopped or a sprinkle of dried

Directions

1. Soft boil the eggs (this takes about 5-6 minutes on my stove, though I know it's often quicker for others.)

2. Toast the bread, butter it thoroughly and then tear it into pieces in a small bowl (a cereal bowl or soup bowl is best.)

3. Peel the eggs and use a spoon to cut them into 4-5 rough pieces over the toast.

4. Season with the salt, pepper, and dill to taste and toss to ensure even distribution of the spices.

You might also like:
For more delicious recipes, gardening ideas, foraging tips, and food-related inspiration "like" the Garden of Eating on Facebook, or follow me on Twitter and Pinterest.

3 comments:

Mr.Pickles said...

How does the soft- boiling work? You just throw the eggies in some boiling water for 5 or 6 minutes, and that's it?
I want it. Sounds comforting.

Y said...

This sounds delicious. A bit like a lazy version of soldiers :)

Anonymous said...

I'm drooling. And I've just eaten supper - Christmas Dinner in fact!

I was looking for bread recipes, but I'm glad I came across this.

Thanks,
Janey
janeyknitting AT yahoo DOT ca
(Change caps to symbols and lose the spaces.)

Saturday, December 29, 2007

Grandpa Joe's Eggs

My grandpa Joe was born in Philadelphia in 1907. He left home at 16 and joined the merchant marines which must be how he got to Rotterdam where this photograph was taken in April of 1927 (the Dutch girl is not my grandmother - they met much later in life.)

Joe Fox (my Grandpa Joe) with a friend in Rotterdam, April 9, 1927 copyright 2015, the Garden of Eating

Although Joe lacked formal education, he had a "great native intelligence" according to my grandmother. He could take apart or put together any kind of machine, system or gadget. He made his living setting up textile mills which meant that my mom had to move often as a child.

Hard-boiled eggs by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

I never met my Grandpa Joe - he died many years before I was born - but he was often present in our house at breakfast time when my mom made "Grandpa Joe's eggs" for my brother and me. It was, and still is, one of my favorite ways to greet the morn. I've been surprised by the extent to which it pleases me that both of my boys love it, too.

Hand holding an egg by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

His creation is simple, hearty, and delicious--soft-boiled eggs broken over torn up pieces of buttered toast and seasoned liberally with salt and pepper. I always added plenty of dill to my bowl of Grandpa Joe's eggs, too. I was practically addicted to dried dill as a kid -- my mom would watch me pouring it on and jokingly ask if I'd like some eggs with my dill.

Fresh dill by Liz Mochrie via Flickr, copyright 2014. https://www.flickr.com/photos/lizziemoch/13961980618/

I still make Grandpa Joe's eggs when I feel like having something cozy and comforting for breakfast and I still like them best with a little dill (though I've switched from dried to fresh). Don't skimp on the butter.

Grandpa Joe's eggs by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

-- print recipe --Grandpa Joe's Eggs
Makes 1 serving

Ingredients

* 1-2 eggs (I suggest getting pasture-raised eggs, preferably from a hen near you)
* 2 pieces of bread (preferably white bread or English muffin)
* Sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
* A few sprigs of fresh dill, chopped or a sprinkle of dried

Directions

1. Soft boil the eggs (this takes about 5-6 minutes on my stove, though I know it's often quicker for others.)

2. Toast the bread, butter it thoroughly and then tear it into pieces in a small bowl (a cereal bowl or soup bowl is best.)

3. Peel the eggs and use a spoon to cut them into 4-5 rough pieces over the toast.

4. Season with the salt, pepper, and dill to taste and toss to ensure even distribution of the spices.

You might also like:
For more delicious recipes, gardening ideas, foraging tips, and food-related inspiration "like" the Garden of Eating on Facebook, or follow me on Twitter and Pinterest.

3 comments:

Mr.Pickles said...

How does the soft- boiling work? You just throw the eggies in some boiling water for 5 or 6 minutes, and that's it?
I want it. Sounds comforting.

Y said...

This sounds delicious. A bit like a lazy version of soldiers :)

Anonymous said...

I'm drooling. And I've just eaten supper - Christmas Dinner in fact!

I was looking for bread recipes, but I'm glad I came across this.

Thanks,
Janey
janeyknitting AT yahoo DOT ca
(Change caps to symbols and lose the spaces.)