Pickled Carrots with Coriander & Cumin Seed

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Pickled carrots with coriander from the Ball Book of Canning & Preserving by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Tomorrow is Can-It-Forward Day and these carrots are a great way to celebrate. Crunchy, sweet, salty, piquant and wonderfully flavorful, these pickled carrots deserve top billing on any cheese or charcuterie plate.

The carrots in our garden are practically begging to be picked right now. And although my little boy bunnies will happily eat a couple of carrots a day, we planted a lot more than we can eat. This seemed like the perfect way to preserve some of them for future eating enjoyment.

Nantes carrots from the garden by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

If you don't grow your own carrots, pick up a bunch or two at your local farmers' market or farm stand.

Carrots from our garden by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

The recipe below is adapted from the All New Ball Book of Canning and Preserving - one of the many recipes I'd tagged to try. I have both the old and the new Ball books and they're both great resources (click here and scroll down for more canning and preserving cookbooks, blogs and resources I like.)

Ingredients for pickled carrots with coriander seedfrom the All New Ball Book of Canning & Preserving by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

As with any canning project, it's easy if you follow the steps and make sure you have everything you need ready to go (I often find that I have run out of lids or bands and have to run out to the store mid-project...)

Packing the jars with carrots before adding the brine by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

If you feel overwhelmed by the prospect of canning something, you can always make these as refrigerator pickles - do everything through step 4 but stop short of actually processing the filled jars in the boiling water bath. Instead, just cover tightly and store in the fridge for up to a month. Enjoy!

Pickled carrots with coriander from the Ball Book of Canning & Preserving by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

If you're new to canning, start by reading this little primer I've put together.

-- print recipe --
Pickled Carrots with Coriander & Cumin Seed
Makes four 1-pint jars

Ingredients

* 3 pounds small (3- to 5-inch) carrots
* 3 cups white vinegar (5% acidity)
* 1/2 cup cider vinegar
* 1/4 cup non-iodized salt (you can either use canning salt or plain old sea salt but skip the iodized table salt as it imparts a yucky flavor to the food)
* 1/4 cup cane sugar
* 2 tsps coriander seeds
* 2 tsps cumin seed
* 2 tsps black peppercorns
* 1 tsp red pepper seed
* 4 garlic cloves, peeled
* 8 sprigs fresh dill

Directions

1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and sterilize the jars, lids and bands.

2. While your jars are boiling, wash and peel the carrots and remove the tops. Trim any carrots that are longer than 4 inches so that they’ll fit comfortably within the jars and cut them in half lengthwise. Or, if you're using longer, fatter carrots, cut them to the right length to fit into your pint jars and slice them into quarters or sixths, depending on how fat they are.

3. Combine the vinegar, salt, sugar and water in a 4-qt. stainless steel saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring until salt and sugar dissolve then reduce the heat and simmer until ready to fill jars.

4. Divide the dried spices, garlic and fresh and dill evenly between the jars then pack tightly with the sliced. Ladle the hot pickling liquid into the jars to cover all the carrots, 1/2-inch headspace. Lay the lids on top and add the bands, tightening with your fingers. Using your jar lifter, place the jars in the boiling water bath and process for 15 minutes.

5. Remove the jars from the boiling water bath and let stand, undisturbed, at room temperature for 24 hours. Check the seals by removing the bands and picking the jar up by the lid only. If the lid is firm, the seal is good. If not, you can either open it up and re-process it but I would just keep that jar in the fridge. Store properly sealed jars in a cool, dark place for several weeks before tasting. Store jars in a cool, dark place for up to a year. Refrigerate after opening.

You might also like:



Ball Canning Book Giveaway

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

This Friday, July 22nd is the 6th annual Can-It-Forward Day. Perfect timing for a giveaway of the following goodies from Ball Jars. These are all great things to help you either get started with canning and preserving or,if you're already a dyed-in-the-wool food preserver, to help you take your preserving efforts up yet another notch.

1. The All New Ball Book of Canning and Preserving:  A newly updated version of their iconic canning cookbook with more than 200 recipes - everything from jams and jellies to jerkies, pickles, salsas and more. I have a copy of both this version and the older one and love them both.


2. A case of Ball's special collection wide mouth blue pint jars: For the first time, the Ball® brand has introduced a line of retro blue glass jars. Kinda fun, eh?

3. One $5 off coupon to be used on whatever you need from Ball's online store - www.FreshPreservingStore.com. Free money!

Entering is easy -- just leave a comment on this post telling me your name, email and what your favorite thing to preserve is before midnight on Friday, July 22nd. Don't feel you have to limit yourself to canning - there's also drying, freezing and infusing!

You can also improve your chances of winning by doing any or all of the following - just let me know what you've done via your comment:

1. Like The Garden of Eating on Facebook.
2. Sign up to receive new blog posts by email.
3. Tweet about this giveaway - make sure your post includes a link back to this post. You can retweet my tweet below or feel free to write your own.

4. Share this giveaway on Facebook - make sure your post includes a link back to this post. You can just hit share below if you like.



You must enter by midnight on 7/22/16 to qualify. Also, I will not add you to my email list - I just need a way to contact you if you happen to win. This giveaway is only open to people in the continental U.S. One lucky winner will be chosen at random. Good luck!

You might also like:



Linden Blossom Syrup

Monday, July 11, 2016

Linden flower syrup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

For about two weeks every summer, you can harvest the beautiful, fragrant flowers of the linden tree and use them to make a delicious syrup. Here in upstate New York, the flowers have just finished but those of you who live further north may be in luck.

Linden flowers by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

There are about 30 or so different species of beautiful, stately trees in the genus Tilia. And they have several common names -- in Britain, they're called either lime trees or linden trees and in North America, they may also be called basswood trees. But linden is my favorite so I'm sticking with it.

Linden flowers by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Each little spray of flowers (I just learned that each individual grouping of flowers is called an "inflorescence" which I love the sound of) has a thin, papery, green "bract" at the bottom of it. Although the bracts are edible, I removed them before making the syrup as they don't add much in the way of flavor and have a tendency to make things mucilaginous. You want to pick the flowers when some of them have yet to open - that way you do not get them too late.

Linden flowers by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Making the flower-infused simple syrup is easy - all you need is lemons, water, sugar, linden flowers and patience.

Linden flowers by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

You start by heating the sugar and water (in this case, I used some agave, too, but you can use all sugar and the color of the syrup will likely be lighter). While it's heating, give the flowers a rinse and a little shake. Once the simple syrup is ready, simply add the flowers along with some lemon juice and zest and give it a stir.

Making Linden flower-infused simple syrup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Let it come to room temperature then put it in the fridge (covered) and wait a few days for the flavor of the flowers to infuse the syrup. When the time is right, drain the solids and store the flower-infused syrup in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a month.

Linden flower syrup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Use it to make cocktails (see here). Or just add it to some seltzer with a little lemon juice for a delicious spritzer. It's great with fruit or yogurt and it was divine drizzled over the panna cotta with strawberries. Just a note: many other parts of the linden tree are also edible and have various medicinal uses. You can also simply dry the flowers to make a floral tea.

Perfect Panna Cotta with fresh strawberries and linden blossom syrup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

-- print recipe --
Linden Blossom Syrup
Makes roughly 3 pints

Ingredients

* 3 cups water
* 5 cups linden blossoms (choose sprays that have some flowers that are open and some buds that are not)
* 4 organic lemons, zest and juice (make sure not to include any of the white pith)
* 1 lb organic cane sugar
* 1 1/2 cups organic agave nectar

Directions

1. Add the sugar and agave nectar to the water in a non-reactive pot (no copper) and bring just to a boil, stirring until the sugar is completely dissolved.

2. Rinse the blossoms and give a little shake to remove any bugs or dirt. Take the pot off the heat and add the lemon juice, zest and flowers.

3. Cover and leave on the counter for about a day then put in the fridge for two to four days to give the flowers time to infuse their flavor into the syrup. Four days is better than two.

4. Pour the syrup through a fine-meshed metal sieve, cheesecloth or a jelly bag into the glass jars or bottles of your choice (I used three glass pint-sized Mason jars) Remove sugar water from the heat and add the lemon juice, zest, and flowers. Cover, allow to come to room temperature, and set aside for a day. Screw the lids on tight and refrigerate - it should keep for at least a month (just check the top for mold :))

You might also like:



Thursday, July 21, 2016

Pickled Carrots with Coriander & Cumin Seed

Pickled carrots with coriander from the Ball Book of Canning & Preserving by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Tomorrow is Can-It-Forward Day and these carrots are a great way to celebrate. Crunchy, sweet, salty, piquant and wonderfully flavorful, these pickled carrots deserve top billing on any cheese or charcuterie plate.

The carrots in our garden are practically begging to be picked right now. And although my little boy bunnies will happily eat a couple of carrots a day, we planted a lot more than we can eat. This seemed like the perfect way to preserve some of them for future eating enjoyment.

Nantes carrots from the garden by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

If you don't grow your own carrots, pick up a bunch or two at your local farmers' market or farm stand.

Carrots from our garden by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

The recipe below is adapted from the All New Ball Book of Canning and Preserving - one of the many recipes I'd tagged to try. I have both the old and the new Ball books and they're both great resources (click here and scroll down for more canning and preserving cookbooks, blogs and resources I like.)

Ingredients for pickled carrots with coriander seedfrom the All New Ball Book of Canning & Preserving by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

As with any canning project, it's easy if you follow the steps and make sure you have everything you need ready to go (I often find that I have run out of lids or bands and have to run out to the store mid-project...)

Packing the jars with carrots before adding the brine by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

If you feel overwhelmed by the prospect of canning something, you can always make these as refrigerator pickles - do everything through step 4 but stop short of actually processing the filled jars in the boiling water bath. Instead, just cover tightly and store in the fridge for up to a month. Enjoy!

Pickled carrots with coriander from the Ball Book of Canning & Preserving by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

If you're new to canning, start by reading this little primer I've put together.

-- print recipe --
Pickled Carrots with Coriander & Cumin Seed
Makes four 1-pint jars

Ingredients

* 3 pounds small (3- to 5-inch) carrots
* 3 cups white vinegar (5% acidity)
* 1/2 cup cider vinegar
* 1/4 cup non-iodized salt (you can either use canning salt or plain old sea salt but skip the iodized table salt as it imparts a yucky flavor to the food)
* 1/4 cup cane sugar
* 2 tsps coriander seeds
* 2 tsps cumin seed
* 2 tsps black peppercorns
* 1 tsp red pepper seed
* 4 garlic cloves, peeled
* 8 sprigs fresh dill

Directions

1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and sterilize the jars, lids and bands.

2. While your jars are boiling, wash and peel the carrots and remove the tops. Trim any carrots that are longer than 4 inches so that they’ll fit comfortably within the jars and cut them in half lengthwise. Or, if you're using longer, fatter carrots, cut them to the right length to fit into your pint jars and slice them into quarters or sixths, depending on how fat they are.

3. Combine the vinegar, salt, sugar and water in a 4-qt. stainless steel saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring until salt and sugar dissolve then reduce the heat and simmer until ready to fill jars.

4. Divide the dried spices, garlic and fresh and dill evenly between the jars then pack tightly with the sliced. Ladle the hot pickling liquid into the jars to cover all the carrots, 1/2-inch headspace. Lay the lids on top and add the bands, tightening with your fingers. Using your jar lifter, place the jars in the boiling water bath and process for 15 minutes.

5. Remove the jars from the boiling water bath and let stand, undisturbed, at room temperature for 24 hours. Check the seals by removing the bands and picking the jar up by the lid only. If the lid is firm, the seal is good. If not, you can either open it up and re-process it but I would just keep that jar in the fridge. Store properly sealed jars in a cool, dark place for several weeks before tasting. Store jars in a cool, dark place for up to a year. Refrigerate after opening.

You might also like:



Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Ball Canning Book Giveaway

This Friday, July 22nd is the 6th annual Can-It-Forward Day. Perfect timing for a giveaway of the following goodies from Ball Jars. These are all great things to help you either get started with canning and preserving or,if you're already a dyed-in-the-wool food preserver, to help you take your preserving efforts up yet another notch.

1. The All New Ball Book of Canning and Preserving:  A newly updated version of their iconic canning cookbook with more than 200 recipes - everything from jams and jellies to jerkies, pickles, salsas and more. I have a copy of both this version and the older one and love them both.


2. A case of Ball's special collection wide mouth blue pint jars: For the first time, the Ball® brand has introduced a line of retro blue glass jars. Kinda fun, eh?

3. One $5 off coupon to be used on whatever you need from Ball's online store - www.FreshPreservingStore.com. Free money!

Entering is easy -- just leave a comment on this post telling me your name, email and what your favorite thing to preserve is before midnight on Friday, July 22nd. Don't feel you have to limit yourself to canning - there's also drying, freezing and infusing!

You can also improve your chances of winning by doing any or all of the following - just let me know what you've done via your comment:

1. Like The Garden of Eating on Facebook.
2. Sign up to receive new blog posts by email.
3. Tweet about this giveaway - make sure your post includes a link back to this post. You can retweet my tweet below or feel free to write your own.

4. Share this giveaway on Facebook - make sure your post includes a link back to this post. You can just hit share below if you like.



You must enter by midnight on 7/22/16 to qualify. Also, I will not add you to my email list - I just need a way to contact you if you happen to win. This giveaway is only open to people in the continental U.S. One lucky winner will be chosen at random. Good luck!

You might also like:



Monday, July 11, 2016

Linden Blossom Syrup

Linden flower syrup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

For about two weeks every summer, you can harvest the beautiful, fragrant flowers of the linden tree and use them to make a delicious syrup. Here in upstate New York, the flowers have just finished but those of you who live further north may be in luck.

Linden flowers by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

There are about 30 or so different species of beautiful, stately trees in the genus Tilia. And they have several common names -- in Britain, they're called either lime trees or linden trees and in North America, they may also be called basswood trees. But linden is my favorite so I'm sticking with it.

Linden flowers by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Each little spray of flowers (I just learned that each individual grouping of flowers is called an "inflorescence" which I love the sound of) has a thin, papery, green "bract" at the bottom of it. Although the bracts are edible, I removed them before making the syrup as they don't add much in the way of flavor and have a tendency to make things mucilaginous. You want to pick the flowers when some of them have yet to open - that way you do not get them too late.

Linden flowers by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Making the flower-infused simple syrup is easy - all you need is lemons, water, sugar, linden flowers and patience.

Linden flowers by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

You start by heating the sugar and water (in this case, I used some agave, too, but you can use all sugar and the color of the syrup will likely be lighter). While it's heating, give the flowers a rinse and a little shake. Once the simple syrup is ready, simply add the flowers along with some lemon juice and zest and give it a stir.

Making Linden flower-infused simple syrup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Let it come to room temperature then put it in the fridge (covered) and wait a few days for the flavor of the flowers to infuse the syrup. When the time is right, drain the solids and store the flower-infused syrup in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a month.

Linden flower syrup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Use it to make cocktails (see here). Or just add it to some seltzer with a little lemon juice for a delicious spritzer. It's great with fruit or yogurt and it was divine drizzled over the panna cotta with strawberries. Just a note: many other parts of the linden tree are also edible and have various medicinal uses. You can also simply dry the flowers to make a floral tea.

Perfect Panna Cotta with fresh strawberries and linden blossom syrup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

-- print recipe --
Linden Blossom Syrup
Makes roughly 3 pints

Ingredients

* 3 cups water
* 5 cups linden blossoms (choose sprays that have some flowers that are open and some buds that are not)
* 4 organic lemons, zest and juice (make sure not to include any of the white pith)
* 1 lb organic cane sugar
* 1 1/2 cups organic agave nectar

Directions

1. Add the sugar and agave nectar to the water in a non-reactive pot (no copper) and bring just to a boil, stirring until the sugar is completely dissolved.

2. Rinse the blossoms and give a little shake to remove any bugs or dirt. Take the pot off the heat and add the lemon juice, zest and flowers.

3. Cover and leave on the counter for about a day then put in the fridge for two to four days to give the flowers time to infuse their flavor into the syrup. Four days is better than two.

4. Pour the syrup through a fine-meshed metal sieve, cheesecloth or a jelly bag into the glass jars or bottles of your choice (I used three glass pint-sized Mason jars) Remove sugar water from the heat and add the lemon juice, zest, and flowers. Cover, allow to come to room temperature, and set aside for a day. Screw the lids on tight and refrigerate - it should keep for at least a month (just check the top for mold :))

You might also like: