30 Thanksgiving Recipes You'll Love

Monday, November 21, 2016


Below is everything you need to make the most delicious Thanksgiving feast ever. There are lots of vegetarian options, a few vegan ones and some fabulous fall desserts. Some are old favorites, some are new favorites - I've added four new savory dishes (all vegetarian, two vegan) and three new desserts including my prize-winnning pumpkin ginger pie. Enjoy!

DINNER

Butternut Squash Lasagna with Leeks & Béchamel Sauce
Treat the vegetarians in your life to this decadent dish. It's a perfect winter meal - elegant and hearty at the same time. The combination of sweet, nutty roasted squash, mellow leeks, sage and garlic-infused béchamel, and gooey, melted Parmesan cheese makes it very hard to stop eating.


Roasted Curried Cauliflower Soup
This soup is creamy and rich with the lovely nutty flavor of roasted cauliflower, the sweetness of caramelized onions and the warm, spicy flavors of places where the birds never need to fly south. And it's VEGAN to boot.


Nutty Farro and Chickpeas Topped with Honey Roasted Carrots and Herb-Spiked Crème Fraîche
Another vegetarian show-stopper. Carrots roasted with honey and a sprinkle of sea salt, black pepper and dried cumin are served atop a jumbled bed of farro and chickpeas that have been tossed in a very simple garlic, olive oil and lemon juice dressing all of which is drizzled with a rich, tangy, cilantro and mint-spiked crème fraîche that ties all the flavors together and a sprinkle of salty, roasted pepitas.


Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Garlic, Parmesan, Buttered Breadcrumb Topping
Nutty, sweet roasted Brussels sprouts topped with a blanket of garlicky, buttery breadcrumbs and Parmesan. Scrumptious!

Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Crisped Parmesan Garlic & Buttered Breadcrumb Topping by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

Nutty Forbidden Rice, Roasted Beet & Kale Salad
This is a gem of a salad. Forbidden rice is a special dark purple - almost black variety that was apparently so nutritious and tasty that it was reserved for royalty only in the not-so-distant past. Loaded with antioxidants it has a lovely, nutty flavor and a toothsome, slightly chewy texture. Sweet roasted beets and fresh, mineral-tasting kale are tossed in a simple dressing of garlic, apple cider vinegar, olive oil and whole grain mustard and topped with some crunchy toasted pecans.

Forbidden rice, kale & beet salad with pecans by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Roasted Fingerling Potatoes with Garden Herbs & Garlic
This is about the simplest potato dish going and it's always really good. Toss fingerlings (or sliced potatoes of a larger nature) with olive oil, garlic and savory herbs and roast until they're crispy on the outside and tender on the inside.


Maple Roasted Yams With Bacon & Beer
A killer combination of rich, sweet and smokey flavors - a guaranteed winner with the meat-eating crowds.

Maple roasted sweet potatoes with bacon and beer by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog

Celeriac Potato Gratin
Gratins of all kinds are just gooood. In this one, you layer thin slices of celery root a.k.a. celeriac (not to be confused with celiac which is a very serious gluten intolerance) with thin slices of potato and cook in a garlic and thyme infused cream bath. It's quite nice.

Celeriac Potato Gratin by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

Maple Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Bacon
Bacon and maple syrup is a simply magical combination. And they both go beautifully with the sweet, homey flavor of Brussels sprouts. The bacon adds a rich, crispy saltiness and the maple syrup adds a smoky sweetness to these hearty little cabbages. Roasting also enhances the natural sugars in these petits choux.

Maple Bacon Roasted Brussels Sprouts by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

Shoestring Brussels Sprouts with Garlic, Whole Grain Mustard & Parmesan
Do NOT be influenced by this sub-par photo, please... Roasting sliced Brussels with a splash of white wine, some whole grain mustard, garlic, olive oil and grated Parmesan cheese yields a wonderfully delicious side dish. I could eat the whole bowl...


Roasted Butternut Squash & Red Peppers With Rosemary & Parmesan
Roasting does magical things to both the squash and the peppers, bringing out their natural sweetness, crisping their edges and adding a delicious, smoky flavor. Paired with bright, astringent rosemary and salty, rich Parmesan cheese, it all adds up to a big bowl of goodness.

Roasted Butternut Squash & Red Peppers With Rosemary & Parmesan by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

Sweet Potatoes & Winter Greens
This recipe is from chef Sam Kass, formerly of the White House kitchen. A hearty mixture of chard (or kale) and sweet potatoes is cooked with a little lemon juice, some maple syrup, cinnamon, cloves and red pepper flakes for a delightful side dish. Once again, please ignore the sub-par photo...


Kale & Brussels Sprouts Salad with Garlicky Dressing, Toasted Almonds & Parmesan
This is such a wonderful combination of flavors and textures. Thinly sliced or shredded kale and Brussels are coated in a garlicky dressing and mixed with Parmsan cheese and toasted almonds. Try it - so so good!

Kale & Brussels Sprout Salad With Toasted Almonds & Pecorino by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

Cider-Glazed Delicata Squash with Rosemary & Sage
Cooking the delicata squash in apple cider renders it tender and sweet. Finish in a browned herb butter featuring the wonderfully warm, earthy flavors of rosemary and sage.

Cider-Glazed Delicata Squash with Rosemary & Sage by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Wilted Kale Salad With Balsamic Vinegar and Orange Zest
This warm kale salad gets a nice zing from grated orange zest and balsamic vinegar. Sauteed onions provide a lovely sweetness.

Wilted kale salad with balsamic vinegar, caramelized onions and orange zest

Turnip Gratin
Turnips are one of those vegetables (like cabbage) that tend to get overshadowed by their flashier cousins. But they have a lovely, delicate sweetness that gets a boost from being cooked in heavy cream with savory herbs and Parmesan. It's a lovely vegetarian side dish.

Turnip gratin by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog copyright 2010

Autumn Crown Squash & Pear Soup with Sage
Pear adds a nice floral sweetness to the nutty squash and sage anchors the flavors with its earthy astringency. Add a dollop of sour cream or creme fraiche to make this extra rich.

Autumn Crown Squash & Pear Soup with Sage by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

Sautéed Kale with Bacon & Cider Vinegar
Mellow, sweet onions, salty bacon and a splash of vinegar make the perfect companions for kale in this quick sauté.

Kale with bacon and vinegar by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2014

Sweet Potato Biscuits
Sweet potato gives these soft, rich biscuits a nice sweetness and a pretty orange color. I sometimes add a little cumin and chili powder for extra pizzaz. Perfect for mopping up gravy...

Sweet Potato Biscuits Cooling From Oven

Sage & Nut-Stuffed Delicata Squash
This is a nice, hearty vegetarian main dish for people who do not partake of the turkey eating. The sweet, slightly nutty flavor of the delicata squash is perfectly accented by the toasted nuts, gooey cheese and the mellow, sweet garlic. Fresh or dried sage adds a lovely, earthy note.

Nut and sage stuffed Delicata squash by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Candied Butternut Squash
A fantastic alternative to candied sweet potatoes. Roasted butternut squash puree mixed with cinnamon, cloves, maple syrup (or brown sugar), butter and heavy cream is homey and delicious. Top with candied pecans to make it truly decadent. You NEED this on your Thanksgiving table this year.

Roasted butternut squash halves by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

Curried Butternut Squash Soup
A super simple, super tasty vegan soup made with sweet butternut squash, creamy coconut milk and warm, exotic curry powder. Top with a little sour cream, creme fraiche or a vegan equivalent.

Curried winter squash soup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2013

Creamed Spinach
I know this photo does not exactly sell it well (it's one of my early ones - thankfully, my photography skills have since improved) but please trust me when I say this is a truly decadent side dish. It's rich, savory and a little sweet and just so good.


Zesty Cranberry Sauce with Orange
Surprisingly easy to make, this cranberry sauce is spiked with the wonderful flavors of fresh orange. So good! Sorry for the crappy photo - I promise it tastes good.



DESSERT

Prize-Winning Pumpkin Ginger Pie
Roasted sugar pumpkin + fresh ginger and a ginger snap crust = one heck of a delicious pie! Top with  fresh, homemade whipped cream because, hey, it's Thanksgiving!


Maple Chocolate Pecan Pie
This is my favorite pie in all the world. Short pie crust holds chunks of chocolate and nutty toasted pecans in a smoky, mapley sweet filling. The recipe comes from my beloved Aunt Maggie who always brought this to Thanksgiving. I'm going to make one in her honor this year.

Maple Chocolate Pecan Pie by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

Maggie's Maple Butter Cookies
Another original recipe from aunt Maggie. These are the most delightful cookies - buttery and crunchy with a rich maple flavor.


Roasted Butternut Squash Pie
Why should pumpkin get all the glory? Roasted butternut squash makes an equally delectable pie filling. This recipe pairs coconut milk with the sweet, roasted squash and the traditional "pumpkin pie" spices - cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and allspice.

A slice of roasted butternut squash pie with Ronnybrook Farm's Hudson Valley Vanilla ice cream by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

Classic Pumpkin Pie
Of course there's no reason not to enjoy a traditional pumpkin pie. Choose a sugar pumpkin (sometimes called a sugar pie pumpkin or pie pumpkin) since the kind of pumpkins that make for good jack-o-lanterns do NOT make for good pies. This recipe calls for a pat in the pan pie crust which is surprisingly easy to make or you can use whatever crust recipe you prefer.

Roasted butternut squash filling and pie crust by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating copyright 2014

Spiced Pumpkin Bread
This batter bread is quick, easy and always a huge hit with my whole family. Fragrant and spiced with just the right amount of sweetness and a perfect, moist crumb.


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10 Things You Can Do To Help America

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

This is not a blog about politics but it is my blog and I can't really think about anything else so I just hope you are not offended if you do not share my views. At the moment, food just seems relatively unimportant (though if you're finding solace in cooking or baking, by all means, take it!)

Despite Trump's relatively slow start, he's begun to assemble the alt-right dream team. Trump's main strategist will be none other than former Breitbart News executive chairman and current anti-Semite and white nationalist, Stephen Bannon. Suddenly, those seemingly overblown comparisons to Nazi Germany do not seem all that dramatic... I'm scared for myself, my family and especially for minorities, gays and lesbians, immigrants, Muslims, Jews, women... Anyone who is not a wealthy, white, Christian man is in for a rough ride. And the implications are global in scope.

So what can we do?!?! The answer to that question is still evolving but in the meantime, here are ten things you can do now:

1. Make a donation to one or more - or ALL - of these organizations - they are going to need our support. If you can swing it financially, consider making a recurring, monthly gift as steady support is crucial to any organization's ability to plan ahead. Making a gift to one of these groups is a wonderful holiday gift for a loved one this year, too, so you can potentially cross two things off your list at once:
I also made a donation to Louisiana Democrat Foster Campbell's campaign - he's running against a well-funded Republican opponent for the last undecided Senate seat in a December 10th run-off election and he needs our help. Senate seats are PRECIOUS and he's a strong candidate. Donate to his campaign here.

And I donated to my local library because libraries are an essential part of any democracy because they provide free books, magazines and internet access to educate and inform oneself no matter how much money one has. And they almost always need more support.


2. Make plans to attend the million woman march in Washington, DC on January 21st or join a march in a city near you - I expect there will be mirror marches all over the country. The march is scheduled for Saturday, January 21st, the day after Trump's inauguration. Housing in DC is already crazily scarce so hopefully you know someone who lives in or near the city.

3. Do some reading to try to get a better grasp on what the Hell just happened and why. I think that many things played a role - from FBI Director Comey's timely (illegal) announcement in late October to the mistaken polling results showing Clinton in the lead that undoubtedly led to lower turnout for her to voter suppression and intimidation on the part of Republicans to Clinton's failure to excite voters or appeal to the Bernie or Bust contingent to the rampant misogyny that plagues our society and more - but the two pieces below provide important points of view:
4. Call your Senators and Representative to protest Stephen Bannon's appointment to the Trump Administration. If you're not sure what to say, this handy-dandy Googledoc contains just about every permutation of script you could need and gets updated regularly. I suggest you bookmark it.

I just called both my Senators, my current Representative, my new House Representative, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (202) 225-3031 - press 6 to leave a message) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell - no answer in DC so I called one of his district offices (502) 582-6304. I also called Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (202)-224-3542 press 1 to speak to a staffperson) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (202) 225-4965 to thank them both for denouncing Bannon and urge them to continue to speak out against bigotry, racism and misogyny. Don't forget your Governor, too. Find out how to reach your elected officials here. And remember that calls are the most effective, followed by actual letters, trailed by emails. Twitter's not a bad idea, either if you use it.
Graphic by Andy Mangold via Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/andymangold/4263951467
5. Take a few deep breaths and remind yourself that the majority of Americans chose Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump and his divisive, hate-filled, misogynistic vision of America. They're still counting the votes but as of right now, Clinton won the popular vote by at least 600,000 votes and likely quite a bit more.

6. Since we're on the topic, it's high time to do away with the electoral college, an outdated, elitist institution which many Constitutional scholars believe to be a vestige of slavery that was designed to keep the masses from choosing someone unfit to lead (oh the irony....) Abolishing the electoral college is a tall order because it would require a Constitutional Amendment but there's no reason not to sign this petition urging Congress to do just that, as far as I can see. However, it's much more realistic to accomplish the same end by mandating that a state's electors vote for whoever wins the popular vote. Which brings me to the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact - an agreement among several U.S. states and the District of Columbia to award all their respective electoral votes to whichever presidential candidate wins the overall popular vote. Once states totaling 270 electoral votes join the compact--which only requires passing state laws-- then the next presidential election will be determined by the popular vote rather than the Electoral College. Read more about this movement and add your name here.

6. Stand up against racism, sexism, bigotry, and homophobia when they rear their ugly heads. This is easier said than done because angry, hateful people are rather scary. If you feel unsafe intervening, try to get someone to join you in doing so first to make it safer. This short video offers simple, solid guidance similar to the cartoon below and is appropriate in most situations.

Some people are wearing a safety pin to signify their commitment to supporting people of color and other minorities from attacks. It's an idea that started in Europe after the UK voted to leave the EU and saw a similar spike in xenophobic violence against Muslims and other people who look "foreign."

7. Prepare to fight hard in the mid-term elections. We have a chance to elect new leaders and flip control of the Senate in just two short years but the fight will begin before 2018. That means donating early and often, volunteering, phone banking, and canvassing. I actively dislike making cold calls and knocking on doors but I don't think there's any way around this if we want to live in an America where everyone is welcome.

8. Volunteer. One of the best ways to help is by getting involved directly and it will also help you feel less frightened and alone. Pick a cause and an organization and volunteer.

9. Reach out to your friends, your family, your community - the people you trust and feel safe with. No one should be alone at a time like this.

10. Last but not least, be kinder than you  think you need to be. The world - and the U.S., especially, desperately needs more kindness, compassion, respect and civility.

Hugs to you all. Also, just a heads up that I moderate all comments so nothing hateful will be published here.

Spiced Pumpkin Bread

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Pumpkin spice bread by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

This bread is such a treat - fragrantly spiced with just the right amount of sweetness. I like to toast it and eat it with a little butter and a sprinkle of salt.

Prepping the sugar pumpkin for roasting by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

I baked it because I had a bunch of pumpkin puree left over from the sugar pumpkins I'd roasted to make my prize-winning pie. Those two cups of pumpkin puree turned into two steaming loaves of pumpkin bread with beautifully cracked tops. Yum!

Roasted sugar pumpkin by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Our older son, who has been more or less refusing all offers of food lately (sigh) has always liked pumpkin bread and has been scarfing it down like there's no tomorrow! Although it's not my first choice for one of his primary sources of nutrition, I was beginning to worry that he was actually losing weight (and he's got nothing to spare) so I just bought another pie pumpkin to make a couple more loaves.

You can certainly substitute canned pumpkin if you're in a rush, but if you have time, use a real sugar pumpkin - they're super cheap, the flavor is way better and it's suprisingly easy. Just cut the pumpkin in half, scoop the seeds out, place the halves, cut-side down on a baking sheet and roast at 350 for about an hour or until you can easily pierce the skin with a fork. Remove, let them cool until you can handle them without getting burned, then scoop the flesh out with a spoon. That's it! Just make sure you buy a pie or sugar pumpkin, not one you'd carve for Halloween as that variety would not taste good.

This is simple recipe that I've adapted slightly adapted from the Joy of Cooking - adding vanilla and a few other spices. I was also out of brown sugar so I used some of the big bag of organic, fair trade coconut sugar my mom gave me recently instead. I was happy to find that the bread tastes great and is a teeny bit better for you since coconut sugar has a relatively low glycemic index for a sweetener and boasts a little bit of nutritional value. Don't get too excited, though, it's still sugar. But I do love that you can do a straight up substitution for cane sugar - no math=good!

Big Tree organic coconut sugar by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

I've been loving this bread just as it is, but if you want to dress it up a bit, fold in a cup of chopped nuts, chocolate chips or diced crystallized ginger after you add the flour in step 3 below.

Pumpkin spice bread by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

-- print recipe --
Spiced Pumpkin Bread
Makes two loaves

Ingredients

* 3 cups flour
* 3 tsps baking soda
* 2 tsp baking powder
* 3 tsps ground cinnamon
* 1/2 tsp ground cloves
* 1 tsp grated nutmeg
* 2 tsps pure vanilla extract
* 1 tsp sea salt
* 1 cup (2 sticks) organic butter, melted and cooled
* 2 1/2 cups firmly packed coconut or brown sugar
* 4 eggs (use pasture-raised if you can find them near you)
* 2 cups cooked, pureed pumpkin or winter squash

Directions

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Grease two 9 x 5-inch loaf pans and set aside.

2. Whisk together the flour, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and salt in a medium bowl.

3. In a large bowl, whisk the butter and sugar until well-blended. Beat in the eggs and pumpkin puree until smooth. Stir in the flour mixture until mixed. Scrape the batter into the greased loaf pans.

4. Bake for about 1 hour and 15 minutes or until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool in the pans for about 10 minutes then remove from the pans and cool completely.

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Monday, November 21, 2016

30 Thanksgiving Recipes You'll Love


Below is everything you need to make the most delicious Thanksgiving feast ever. There are lots of vegetarian options, a few vegan ones and some fabulous fall desserts. Some are old favorites, some are new favorites - I've added four new savory dishes (all vegetarian, two vegan) and three new desserts including my prize-winnning pumpkin ginger pie. Enjoy!

DINNER

Butternut Squash Lasagna with Leeks & Béchamel Sauce
Treat the vegetarians in your life to this decadent dish. It's a perfect winter meal - elegant and hearty at the same time. The combination of sweet, nutty roasted squash, mellow leeks, sage and garlic-infused béchamel, and gooey, melted Parmesan cheese makes it very hard to stop eating.


Roasted Curried Cauliflower Soup
This soup is creamy and rich with the lovely nutty flavor of roasted cauliflower, the sweetness of caramelized onions and the warm, spicy flavors of places where the birds never need to fly south. And it's VEGAN to boot.


Nutty Farro and Chickpeas Topped with Honey Roasted Carrots and Herb-Spiked Crème Fraîche
Another vegetarian show-stopper. Carrots roasted with honey and a sprinkle of sea salt, black pepper and dried cumin are served atop a jumbled bed of farro and chickpeas that have been tossed in a very simple garlic, olive oil and lemon juice dressing all of which is drizzled with a rich, tangy, cilantro and mint-spiked crème fraîche that ties all the flavors together and a sprinkle of salty, roasted pepitas.


Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Garlic, Parmesan, Buttered Breadcrumb Topping
Nutty, sweet roasted Brussels sprouts topped with a blanket of garlicky, buttery breadcrumbs and Parmesan. Scrumptious!

Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Crisped Parmesan Garlic & Buttered Breadcrumb Topping by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

Nutty Forbidden Rice, Roasted Beet & Kale Salad
This is a gem of a salad. Forbidden rice is a special dark purple - almost black variety that was apparently so nutritious and tasty that it was reserved for royalty only in the not-so-distant past. Loaded with antioxidants it has a lovely, nutty flavor and a toothsome, slightly chewy texture. Sweet roasted beets and fresh, mineral-tasting kale are tossed in a simple dressing of garlic, apple cider vinegar, olive oil and whole grain mustard and topped with some crunchy toasted pecans.

Forbidden rice, kale & beet salad with pecans by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Roasted Fingerling Potatoes with Garden Herbs & Garlic
This is about the simplest potato dish going and it's always really good. Toss fingerlings (or sliced potatoes of a larger nature) with olive oil, garlic and savory herbs and roast until they're crispy on the outside and tender on the inside.


Maple Roasted Yams With Bacon & Beer
A killer combination of rich, sweet and smokey flavors - a guaranteed winner with the meat-eating crowds.

Maple roasted sweet potatoes with bacon and beer by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog

Celeriac Potato Gratin
Gratins of all kinds are just gooood. In this one, you layer thin slices of celery root a.k.a. celeriac (not to be confused with celiac which is a very serious gluten intolerance) with thin slices of potato and cook in a garlic and thyme infused cream bath. It's quite nice.

Celeriac Potato Gratin by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

Maple Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Bacon
Bacon and maple syrup is a simply magical combination. And they both go beautifully with the sweet, homey flavor of Brussels sprouts. The bacon adds a rich, crispy saltiness and the maple syrup adds a smoky sweetness to these hearty little cabbages. Roasting also enhances the natural sugars in these petits choux.

Maple Bacon Roasted Brussels Sprouts by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

Shoestring Brussels Sprouts with Garlic, Whole Grain Mustard & Parmesan
Do NOT be influenced by this sub-par photo, please... Roasting sliced Brussels with a splash of white wine, some whole grain mustard, garlic, olive oil and grated Parmesan cheese yields a wonderfully delicious side dish. I could eat the whole bowl...


Roasted Butternut Squash & Red Peppers With Rosemary & Parmesan
Roasting does magical things to both the squash and the peppers, bringing out their natural sweetness, crisping their edges and adding a delicious, smoky flavor. Paired with bright, astringent rosemary and salty, rich Parmesan cheese, it all adds up to a big bowl of goodness.

Roasted Butternut Squash & Red Peppers With Rosemary & Parmesan by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

Sweet Potatoes & Winter Greens
This recipe is from chef Sam Kass, formerly of the White House kitchen. A hearty mixture of chard (or kale) and sweet potatoes is cooked with a little lemon juice, some maple syrup, cinnamon, cloves and red pepper flakes for a delightful side dish. Once again, please ignore the sub-par photo...


Kale & Brussels Sprouts Salad with Garlicky Dressing, Toasted Almonds & Parmesan
This is such a wonderful combination of flavors and textures. Thinly sliced or shredded kale and Brussels are coated in a garlicky dressing and mixed with Parmsan cheese and toasted almonds. Try it - so so good!

Kale & Brussels Sprout Salad With Toasted Almonds & Pecorino by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

Cider-Glazed Delicata Squash with Rosemary & Sage
Cooking the delicata squash in apple cider renders it tender and sweet. Finish in a browned herb butter featuring the wonderfully warm, earthy flavors of rosemary and sage.

Cider-Glazed Delicata Squash with Rosemary & Sage by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Wilted Kale Salad With Balsamic Vinegar and Orange Zest
This warm kale salad gets a nice zing from grated orange zest and balsamic vinegar. Sauteed onions provide a lovely sweetness.

Wilted kale salad with balsamic vinegar, caramelized onions and orange zest

Turnip Gratin
Turnips are one of those vegetables (like cabbage) that tend to get overshadowed by their flashier cousins. But they have a lovely, delicate sweetness that gets a boost from being cooked in heavy cream with savory herbs and Parmesan. It's a lovely vegetarian side dish.

Turnip gratin by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog copyright 2010

Autumn Crown Squash & Pear Soup with Sage
Pear adds a nice floral sweetness to the nutty squash and sage anchors the flavors with its earthy astringency. Add a dollop of sour cream or creme fraiche to make this extra rich.

Autumn Crown Squash & Pear Soup with Sage by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

Sautéed Kale with Bacon & Cider Vinegar
Mellow, sweet onions, salty bacon and a splash of vinegar make the perfect companions for kale in this quick sauté.

Kale with bacon and vinegar by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2014

Sweet Potato Biscuits
Sweet potato gives these soft, rich biscuits a nice sweetness and a pretty orange color. I sometimes add a little cumin and chili powder for extra pizzaz. Perfect for mopping up gravy...

Sweet Potato Biscuits Cooling From Oven

Sage & Nut-Stuffed Delicata Squash
This is a nice, hearty vegetarian main dish for people who do not partake of the turkey eating. The sweet, slightly nutty flavor of the delicata squash is perfectly accented by the toasted nuts, gooey cheese and the mellow, sweet garlic. Fresh or dried sage adds a lovely, earthy note.

Nut and sage stuffed Delicata squash by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Candied Butternut Squash
A fantastic alternative to candied sweet potatoes. Roasted butternut squash puree mixed with cinnamon, cloves, maple syrup (or brown sugar), butter and heavy cream is homey and delicious. Top with candied pecans to make it truly decadent. You NEED this on your Thanksgiving table this year.

Roasted butternut squash halves by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

Curried Butternut Squash Soup
A super simple, super tasty vegan soup made with sweet butternut squash, creamy coconut milk and warm, exotic curry powder. Top with a little sour cream, creme fraiche or a vegan equivalent.

Curried winter squash soup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2013

Creamed Spinach
I know this photo does not exactly sell it well (it's one of my early ones - thankfully, my photography skills have since improved) but please trust me when I say this is a truly decadent side dish. It's rich, savory and a little sweet and just so good.


Zesty Cranberry Sauce with Orange
Surprisingly easy to make, this cranberry sauce is spiked with the wonderful flavors of fresh orange. So good! Sorry for the crappy photo - I promise it tastes good.



DESSERT

Prize-Winning Pumpkin Ginger Pie
Roasted sugar pumpkin + fresh ginger and a ginger snap crust = one heck of a delicious pie! Top with  fresh, homemade whipped cream because, hey, it's Thanksgiving!


Maple Chocolate Pecan Pie
This is my favorite pie in all the world. Short pie crust holds chunks of chocolate and nutty toasted pecans in a smoky, mapley sweet filling. The recipe comes from my beloved Aunt Maggie who always brought this to Thanksgiving. I'm going to make one in her honor this year.

Maple Chocolate Pecan Pie by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

Maggie's Maple Butter Cookies
Another original recipe from aunt Maggie. These are the most delightful cookies - buttery and crunchy with a rich maple flavor.


Roasted Butternut Squash Pie
Why should pumpkin get all the glory? Roasted butternut squash makes an equally delectable pie filling. This recipe pairs coconut milk with the sweet, roasted squash and the traditional "pumpkin pie" spices - cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and allspice.

A slice of roasted butternut squash pie with Ronnybrook Farm's Hudson Valley Vanilla ice cream by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

Classic Pumpkin Pie
Of course there's no reason not to enjoy a traditional pumpkin pie. Choose a sugar pumpkin (sometimes called a sugar pie pumpkin or pie pumpkin) since the kind of pumpkins that make for good jack-o-lanterns do NOT make for good pies. This recipe calls for a pat in the pan pie crust which is surprisingly easy to make or you can use whatever crust recipe you prefer.

Roasted butternut squash filling and pie crust by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating copyright 2014

Spiced Pumpkin Bread
This batter bread is quick, easy and always a huge hit with my whole family. Fragrant and spiced with just the right amount of sweetness and a perfect, moist crumb.


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Tuesday, November 15, 2016

10 Things You Can Do To Help America

This is not a blog about politics but it is my blog and I can't really think about anything else so I just hope you are not offended if you do not share my views. At the moment, food just seems relatively unimportant (though if you're finding solace in cooking or baking, by all means, take it!)

Despite Trump's relatively slow start, he's begun to assemble the alt-right dream team. Trump's main strategist will be none other than former Breitbart News executive chairman and current anti-Semite and white nationalist, Stephen Bannon. Suddenly, those seemingly overblown comparisons to Nazi Germany do not seem all that dramatic... I'm scared for myself, my family and especially for minorities, gays and lesbians, immigrants, Muslims, Jews, women... Anyone who is not a wealthy, white, Christian man is in for a rough ride. And the implications are global in scope.

So what can we do?!?! The answer to that question is still evolving but in the meantime, here are ten things you can do now:

1. Make a donation to one or more - or ALL - of these organizations - they are going to need our support. If you can swing it financially, consider making a recurring, monthly gift as steady support is crucial to any organization's ability to plan ahead. Making a gift to one of these groups is a wonderful holiday gift for a loved one this year, too, so you can potentially cross two things off your list at once:
I also made a donation to Louisiana Democrat Foster Campbell's campaign - he's running against a well-funded Republican opponent for the last undecided Senate seat in a December 10th run-off election and he needs our help. Senate seats are PRECIOUS and he's a strong candidate. Donate to his campaign here.

And I donated to my local library because libraries are an essential part of any democracy because they provide free books, magazines and internet access to educate and inform oneself no matter how much money one has. And they almost always need more support.


2. Make plans to attend the million woman march in Washington, DC on January 21st or join a march in a city near you - I expect there will be mirror marches all over the country. The march is scheduled for Saturday, January 21st, the day after Trump's inauguration. Housing in DC is already crazily scarce so hopefully you know someone who lives in or near the city.

3. Do some reading to try to get a better grasp on what the Hell just happened and why. I think that many things played a role - from FBI Director Comey's timely (illegal) announcement in late October to the mistaken polling results showing Clinton in the lead that undoubtedly led to lower turnout for her to voter suppression and intimidation on the part of Republicans to Clinton's failure to excite voters or appeal to the Bernie or Bust contingent to the rampant misogyny that plagues our society and more - but the two pieces below provide important points of view:
4. Call your Senators and Representative to protest Stephen Bannon's appointment to the Trump Administration. If you're not sure what to say, this handy-dandy Googledoc contains just about every permutation of script you could need and gets updated regularly. I suggest you bookmark it.

I just called both my Senators, my current Representative, my new House Representative, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (202) 225-3031 - press 6 to leave a message) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell - no answer in DC so I called one of his district offices (502) 582-6304. I also called Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (202)-224-3542 press 1 to speak to a staffperson) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (202) 225-4965 to thank them both for denouncing Bannon and urge them to continue to speak out against bigotry, racism and misogyny. Don't forget your Governor, too. Find out how to reach your elected officials here. And remember that calls are the most effective, followed by actual letters, trailed by emails. Twitter's not a bad idea, either if you use it.
Graphic by Andy Mangold via Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/andymangold/4263951467
5. Take a few deep breaths and remind yourself that the majority of Americans chose Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump and his divisive, hate-filled, misogynistic vision of America. They're still counting the votes but as of right now, Clinton won the popular vote by at least 600,000 votes and likely quite a bit more.

6. Since we're on the topic, it's high time to do away with the electoral college, an outdated, elitist institution which many Constitutional scholars believe to be a vestige of slavery that was designed to keep the masses from choosing someone unfit to lead (oh the irony....) Abolishing the electoral college is a tall order because it would require a Constitutional Amendment but there's no reason not to sign this petition urging Congress to do just that, as far as I can see. However, it's much more realistic to accomplish the same end by mandating that a state's electors vote for whoever wins the popular vote. Which brings me to the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact - an agreement among several U.S. states and the District of Columbia to award all their respective electoral votes to whichever presidential candidate wins the overall popular vote. Once states totaling 270 electoral votes join the compact--which only requires passing state laws-- then the next presidential election will be determined by the popular vote rather than the Electoral College. Read more about this movement and add your name here.

6. Stand up against racism, sexism, bigotry, and homophobia when they rear their ugly heads. This is easier said than done because angry, hateful people are rather scary. If you feel unsafe intervening, try to get someone to join you in doing so first to make it safer. This short video offers simple, solid guidance similar to the cartoon below and is appropriate in most situations.

Some people are wearing a safety pin to signify their commitment to supporting people of color and other minorities from attacks. It's an idea that started in Europe after the UK voted to leave the EU and saw a similar spike in xenophobic violence against Muslims and other people who look "foreign."

7. Prepare to fight hard in the mid-term elections. We have a chance to elect new leaders and flip control of the Senate in just two short years but the fight will begin before 2018. That means donating early and often, volunteering, phone banking, and canvassing. I actively dislike making cold calls and knocking on doors but I don't think there's any way around this if we want to live in an America where everyone is welcome.

8. Volunteer. One of the best ways to help is by getting involved directly and it will also help you feel less frightened and alone. Pick a cause and an organization and volunteer.

9. Reach out to your friends, your family, your community - the people you trust and feel safe with. No one should be alone at a time like this.

10. Last but not least, be kinder than you  think you need to be. The world - and the U.S., especially, desperately needs more kindness, compassion, respect and civility.

Hugs to you all. Also, just a heads up that I moderate all comments so nothing hateful will be published here.

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Spiced Pumpkin Bread

Pumpkin spice bread by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

This bread is such a treat - fragrantly spiced with just the right amount of sweetness. I like to toast it and eat it with a little butter and a sprinkle of salt.

Prepping the sugar pumpkin for roasting by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

I baked it because I had a bunch of pumpkin puree left over from the sugar pumpkins I'd roasted to make my prize-winning pie. Those two cups of pumpkin puree turned into two steaming loaves of pumpkin bread with beautifully cracked tops. Yum!

Roasted sugar pumpkin by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Our older son, who has been more or less refusing all offers of food lately (sigh) has always liked pumpkin bread and has been scarfing it down like there's no tomorrow! Although it's not my first choice for one of his primary sources of nutrition, I was beginning to worry that he was actually losing weight (and he's got nothing to spare) so I just bought another pie pumpkin to make a couple more loaves.

You can certainly substitute canned pumpkin if you're in a rush, but if you have time, use a real sugar pumpkin - they're super cheap, the flavor is way better and it's suprisingly easy. Just cut the pumpkin in half, scoop the seeds out, place the halves, cut-side down on a baking sheet and roast at 350 for about an hour or until you can easily pierce the skin with a fork. Remove, let them cool until you can handle them without getting burned, then scoop the flesh out with a spoon. That's it! Just make sure you buy a pie or sugar pumpkin, not one you'd carve for Halloween as that variety would not taste good.

This is simple recipe that I've adapted slightly adapted from the Joy of Cooking - adding vanilla and a few other spices. I was also out of brown sugar so I used some of the big bag of organic, fair trade coconut sugar my mom gave me recently instead. I was happy to find that the bread tastes great and is a teeny bit better for you since coconut sugar has a relatively low glycemic index for a sweetener and boasts a little bit of nutritional value. Don't get too excited, though, it's still sugar. But I do love that you can do a straight up substitution for cane sugar - no math=good!

Big Tree organic coconut sugar by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

I've been loving this bread just as it is, but if you want to dress it up a bit, fold in a cup of chopped nuts, chocolate chips or diced crystallized ginger after you add the flour in step 3 below.

Pumpkin spice bread by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

-- print recipe --
Spiced Pumpkin Bread
Makes two loaves

Ingredients

* 3 cups flour
* 3 tsps baking soda
* 2 tsp baking powder
* 3 tsps ground cinnamon
* 1/2 tsp ground cloves
* 1 tsp grated nutmeg
* 2 tsps pure vanilla extract
* 1 tsp sea salt
* 1 cup (2 sticks) organic butter, melted and cooled
* 2 1/2 cups firmly packed coconut or brown sugar
* 4 eggs (use pasture-raised if you can find them near you)
* 2 cups cooked, pureed pumpkin or winter squash

Directions

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Grease two 9 x 5-inch loaf pans and set aside.

2. Whisk together the flour, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and salt in a medium bowl.

3. In a large bowl, whisk the butter and sugar until well-blended. Beat in the eggs and pumpkin puree until smooth. Stir in the flour mixture until mixed. Scrape the batter into the greased loaf pans.

4. Bake for about 1 hour and 15 minutes or until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool in the pans for about 10 minutes then remove from the pans and cool completely.

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