6 Delicious Desserts To Make This Month

Thursday, July 5, 2018


These tried and true favorites make the most of what's fresh right now. Enjoy these six sweet ways to celebrate July's bounty of blueberries, peaches, raspberries and more.



Blueberry Honey Yogurt Tart with Gingery Graham Cracker Crust

This chilled tart is the perfect way to end to a hot day. Drained Greek yogurt sweetened with a little honey provides a creamy, slightly tangy base for the fresh blueberries that are just coming into season. The crystallized ginger in the graham cracker crust adds a fabulous little zing.

Blueberry yogurt tart with ginger graham crust by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2012

Wild Wineberry Sorbet

Wineberries are invasive but so tasty that I forgive them (more info on foraging for them here). Go pick some, then turn whatever actually makes it home with you into this refreshing, simple dessert. If you don't have wineberries, you can still enjoy this quick, cool dessert with good old raspberries.

Wild wineberry lemon balm sorbet by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

Chocolate Raspberry Tart

A buttery shortbread crust holds this out-of-this-world combination of chocolate and raspberries. It is so good! It takes a bit more time to prepare than most of the recipes here but is well worth the effort.

Chocolate Raspberry Tart by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

Peach Cobbler with Biscuit Topping

This is one of my go-to summer desserts. This perfect recipe comes courtesy of a Cook's Illustrated many years back. The biscuits are made with yogurt and come together quickly. You do have to turn the oven on but not for very long - less than half an hour total. Always a hit!

Fresh peach cobbler with biscuit topping

Dark Chocolate & Orange Beetroot Cake

This lovely chocolate cake gets both moisture and some of its sweetness from the beets that are just coming into season. Adapted from Sarah Raven's lovely cookbook, Fresh From The Garden, this  cake has a perfect crumb and a fantastic, sophisticated flavor profile. You can drizzle with a chocolate glaze or serve it with fresh whipped cream sweetened with a little maple syrup.

Chocolate orange beetroot cake by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Peach Frangipane Tart

This lovely, rustic tart pairs the juicy sweetness of fresh peaches with the rich, nuttiness of frangipane nestled in a flaky, buttery crust. I use store-bought puff pastry to make life easier. Dufours puff pastry is the gold standard if it's available near you (though it is NOT cheap) (if you use it regularly enough, you can buy a 10-pack on Amazon) but any brand will yield a reliably tasty tart crust.

Peach Frangipane Tart by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

You might also like:






Strawberry Panna Cotta

Enjoy Fresh Herbs Now AND Later - Recipes & Tips For Freezing and Drying

Monday, June 25, 2018

Trio of herbs by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2012

After that long,frigd winter, I'm particularly grateful for all the bright, fresh flavors popping in my garden right now. It's luxurious to walk outside to gather a few sprigs of dill for my morning eggs, some basil leaves for garlic bread, a handful of cilantro to garnish a stir-fry or a few fuzzy leaves of apple mint to add to a cucumber-yogurt sauce.

To make these lovely flavors last beyond the summer, I rely primarily on the freezer.

Frozen, chopped oregano

I like to freeze chopped, fresh dill, parsley, cilantro and basil as they hit their stride.

It's easy- just rinse and dry them, take the leaves off the stem, chop coarsely, mix with a little olive oil and fill an ice cube tray with the bright green paste. Once they've frozen fully, pop the fresh herb cubes out and store them in a heavy duty freezer bag for up to a year. But don't forget to label the bag - it can be difficult to tell which green thing is in there once you've got a shelf full of them.

Frozen pesto by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2018

I also like to make big batches of pesto - both regular and garlic scape pesto - to freeze for the year ahead. All you have to do is toss a couple of these little, green bricks into a pot of hot, buttered pasta or a pan of polenta or risotto and you've got an instant, summer-infused treat. The only difference from the herbs above is that I sometimes opt to freeze the pesto in larger portions in these great Beaba silicone trays I bought to freeze baby food for our first son 10 years ago. We're way past that stage now but still use them all the time.

Freezer beaba tray of garlic scape pesto by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2012

My friend, Liza recently told me she freezes her homemade chimichurri sauce -a great idea! So I made a big batch this morning with our cilantro, parsley and oregano and froze half of it.

Chimichurri Sauce by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog

Once tomato season arrives, I will roast them with tons of of thyme, basil, oregano and rosemary and freeze them in quart bags. One thing I love about this technique is that you can use herbs that are already flowering and you don't even need to remove the stems.

Slow roasted heirloom tomatoes with garlic and herbs by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

My buddy Liza also gave me the idea of making sofrito - the base for many Spanish and Caribbean dishes - and freezing it. Check out Nourished Kitchen's recipe for Spanish-style sofrito here - this one, which is cooked first, includes tomatoes rather than peppers and features Mediterranean herbs- rosemary and thyme.

Or try Serious Eats Puerto Rican style sofrito which is raw and features peppers and culantro (you can substitute cilantro). Liza also adds a little oil to the batch she plans to freeze so she can just pop a cube into the pan and get cooking.

Once pepper and tomato season rolls around, I plan to make both kinds and freeze them.

Sofrito - photo by Emily Barney via Flickr, https://www.flickr.com/photos/ebarney/4608452143

Although the freezer is my favorite, I also dry fresh sage, mint, rosemary, oregano and summer savory. You just rinse the herbs, dry them thoroughly then hang in a dry, covered location that is out of direct sunlight, has good ventilation and no mold issues. Make sure not to overfill your bundles or hang them too close to each other - you want the air to reach everywhere.

Depending on the weather conditions and the herbs you've chosen, it can take up to two weeks for them to dry out fully--you're looking for a crispy crunch when you crumble them between your fingers. If its been rainy out, I'll pop them into the food dehydrator for an hour or so to finish them off. Once they're bone dry, I crumble them into a Mason jar, cap them and store in my cool, dark, dry pantry.

Drying fresh sage by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2013

There is little I find as satisfying as filling my freezer and pantry with delicious things to eat. Primal urge to survive the winter in style - .

You might also like:











Six Strawberry Delights

Sunday, June 10, 2018


Earlier this spring, I ruthlessly clipped the runners on our tangle of strawberry plants and they're rewarding me by producing like never before! There are actually enough for us to enjoy a few perfect berries in spite of the chipmunks taking a heartbreaking, single bite out of 80% of them. And they are amazing - delicately sweet and tart.

Right now is the time to enjoy them and here are six recipes you might like.

1. Pair fresh strawberries with a vanilla panna cotta - their sweet, tartness is a wonderful companion to the creaminess.


2. Make a strawberry rhubarb pie- if you've never tried it before, the combination of strawberries and tart rhubarb is surprisingly wonderful. And lots of butter and sugar don't hurt.


3. Muddle some berries with lemon juice, fresh mint and sugar to make a refreshing strawberry mint lemonade.


4. Add some other berries, apple or invasive Japanese knotweed to make a delicious strawberry crisp.


5. Make the summertime classic, strawberry shortcake.


6. Make your own jam and enjoy it all year long.


You might also like:




Thursday, July 5, 2018

6 Delicious Desserts To Make This Month


These tried and true favorites make the most of what's fresh right now. Enjoy these six sweet ways to celebrate July's bounty of blueberries, peaches, raspberries and more.



Blueberry Honey Yogurt Tart with Gingery Graham Cracker Crust

This chilled tart is the perfect way to end to a hot day. Drained Greek yogurt sweetened with a little honey provides a creamy, slightly tangy base for the fresh blueberries that are just coming into season. The crystallized ginger in the graham cracker crust adds a fabulous little zing.

Blueberry yogurt tart with ginger graham crust by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2012

Wild Wineberry Sorbet

Wineberries are invasive but so tasty that I forgive them (more info on foraging for them here). Go pick some, then turn whatever actually makes it home with you into this refreshing, simple dessert. If you don't have wineberries, you can still enjoy this quick, cool dessert with good old raspberries.

Wild wineberry lemon balm sorbet by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

Chocolate Raspberry Tart

A buttery shortbread crust holds this out-of-this-world combination of chocolate and raspberries. It is so good! It takes a bit more time to prepare than most of the recipes here but is well worth the effort.

Chocolate Raspberry Tart by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2011

Peach Cobbler with Biscuit Topping

This is one of my go-to summer desserts. This perfect recipe comes courtesy of a Cook's Illustrated many years back. The biscuits are made with yogurt and come together quickly. You do have to turn the oven on but not for very long - less than half an hour total. Always a hit!

Fresh peach cobbler with biscuit topping

Dark Chocolate & Orange Beetroot Cake

This lovely chocolate cake gets both moisture and some of its sweetness from the beets that are just coming into season. Adapted from Sarah Raven's lovely cookbook, Fresh From The Garden, this  cake has a perfect crumb and a fantastic, sophisticated flavor profile. You can drizzle with a chocolate glaze or serve it with fresh whipped cream sweetened with a little maple syrup.

Chocolate orange beetroot cake by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2015

Peach Frangipane Tart

This lovely, rustic tart pairs the juicy sweetness of fresh peaches with the rich, nuttiness of frangipane nestled in a flaky, buttery crust. I use store-bought puff pastry to make life easier. Dufours puff pastry is the gold standard if it's available near you (though it is NOT cheap) (if you use it regularly enough, you can buy a 10-pack on Amazon) but any brand will yield a reliably tasty tart crust.

Peach Frangipane Tart by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

You might also like:






Strawberry Panna Cotta

Monday, June 25, 2018

Enjoy Fresh Herbs Now AND Later - Recipes & Tips For Freezing and Drying

Trio of herbs by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2012

After that long,frigd winter, I'm particularly grateful for all the bright, fresh flavors popping in my garden right now. It's luxurious to walk outside to gather a few sprigs of dill for my morning eggs, some basil leaves for garlic bread, a handful of cilantro to garnish a stir-fry or a few fuzzy leaves of apple mint to add to a cucumber-yogurt sauce.

To make these lovely flavors last beyond the summer, I rely primarily on the freezer.

Frozen, chopped oregano

I like to freeze chopped, fresh dill, parsley, cilantro and basil as they hit their stride.

It's easy- just rinse and dry them, take the leaves off the stem, chop coarsely, mix with a little olive oil and fill an ice cube tray with the bright green paste. Once they've frozen fully, pop the fresh herb cubes out and store them in a heavy duty freezer bag for up to a year. But don't forget to label the bag - it can be difficult to tell which green thing is in there once you've got a shelf full of them.

Frozen pesto by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2018

I also like to make big batches of pesto - both regular and garlic scape pesto - to freeze for the year ahead. All you have to do is toss a couple of these little, green bricks into a pot of hot, buttered pasta or a pan of polenta or risotto and you've got an instant, summer-infused treat. The only difference from the herbs above is that I sometimes opt to freeze the pesto in larger portions in these great Beaba silicone trays I bought to freeze baby food for our first son 10 years ago. We're way past that stage now but still use them all the time.

Freezer beaba tray of garlic scape pesto by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2012

My friend, Liza recently told me she freezes her homemade chimichurri sauce -a great idea! So I made a big batch this morning with our cilantro, parsley and oregano and froze half of it.

Chimichurri Sauce by Eve Fox, Garden of Eating blog

Once tomato season arrives, I will roast them with tons of of thyme, basil, oregano and rosemary and freeze them in quart bags. One thing I love about this technique is that you can use herbs that are already flowering and you don't even need to remove the stems.

Slow roasted heirloom tomatoes with garlic and herbs by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2014

My buddy Liza also gave me the idea of making sofrito - the base for many Spanish and Caribbean dishes - and freezing it. Check out Nourished Kitchen's recipe for Spanish-style sofrito here - this one, which is cooked first, includes tomatoes rather than peppers and features Mediterranean herbs- rosemary and thyme.

Or try Serious Eats Puerto Rican style sofrito which is raw and features peppers and culantro (you can substitute cilantro). Liza also adds a little oil to the batch she plans to freeze so she can just pop a cube into the pan and get cooking.

Once pepper and tomato season rolls around, I plan to make both kinds and freeze them.

Sofrito - photo by Emily Barney via Flickr, https://www.flickr.com/photos/ebarney/4608452143

Although the freezer is my favorite, I also dry fresh sage, mint, rosemary, oregano and summer savory. You just rinse the herbs, dry them thoroughly then hang in a dry, covered location that is out of direct sunlight, has good ventilation and no mold issues. Make sure not to overfill your bundles or hang them too close to each other - you want the air to reach everywhere.

Depending on the weather conditions and the herbs you've chosen, it can take up to two weeks for them to dry out fully--you're looking for a crispy crunch when you crumble them between your fingers. If its been rainy out, I'll pop them into the food dehydrator for an hour or so to finish them off. Once they're bone dry, I crumble them into a Mason jar, cap them and store in my cool, dark, dry pantry.

Drying fresh sage by Eve Fox, The Garden of Eating blog, copyright 2013

There is little I find as satisfying as filling my freezer and pantry with delicious things to eat. Primal urge to survive the winter in style - .

You might also like:











Sunday, June 10, 2018

Six Strawberry Delights


Earlier this spring, I ruthlessly clipped the runners on our tangle of strawberry plants and they're rewarding me by producing like never before! There are actually enough for us to enjoy a few perfect berries in spite of the chipmunks taking a heartbreaking, single bite out of 80% of them. And they are amazing - delicately sweet and tart.

Right now is the time to enjoy them and here are six recipes you might like.

1. Pair fresh strawberries with a vanilla panna cotta - their sweet, tartness is a wonderful companion to the creaminess.


2. Make a strawberry rhubarb pie- if you've never tried it before, the combination of strawberries and tart rhubarb is surprisingly wonderful. And lots of butter and sugar don't hurt.


3. Muddle some berries with lemon juice, fresh mint and sugar to make a refreshing strawberry mint lemonade.


4. Add some other berries, apple or invasive Japanese knotweed to make a delicious strawberry crisp.


5. Make the summertime classic, strawberry shortcake.


6. Make your own jam and enjoy it all year long.


You might also like: