Summer Stew with Eggplant, Tomato, Peppers and Chickpeas

Monday, September 26, 2016

Summer stew with eggplant, peppers, tomatoes and chickpeas by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Fall is a perfect time to make this lovely, simple summer stew from Deborah Madison's excellent cookbook, Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone. The flavors are fresh and clean. Served over quinoa, it makes a wonderful meal. Healthy, too.

Tomatoes from the garden by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

The second round of tomatoes are ripening right now and the eggplants are still coming strong. There was a chance of frost last night but it didn't get us, thankfully.

Eggplants from the garden by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

There's a bunch of slicing and dicing.

Sauteeing the eggplants by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Followed by a bunch of sautéeing and some simmering. I stuck pretty close to the recipe but added some fresh herbs from our garden - oregano, tarragon and thyme.

Sauteeing onions, garlic, peppers and paprika by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

I served it over some quinoa I cooked in vegetable broth and fluffed with a little butter (makes it extra tasty.)

Quinoa by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

The chickpeas give it a little more substance, making it a perfect vegetarian main dish. Enjoy!

Summer stew with eggplant, peppers, tomatoes and chickpeas by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

-- print recipe --Summer Stew with Eggplant, Tomato, Peppers and Chickpeas
Adapted from Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone
Serves 4-6

Ingredients

* 1 1/2 lbs eggplant
* 6 Tbsps extra-virgin olive oil
* 1 large red onion, diced into 1/2 to 2/3-inch squares
* 1 large red or yellow bell pepper, diced into 2/3- to 3/4-inch squares
* 2 tsps smoked paprika
* 2 plump cloves of garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
* 2 Tbsps tomato paste
* 5 plum tomatoes, diced
* 1 15-oz. can organic chickpeas, drained & rinsed
* 1 cup vegetable stock
* 1/4 cup minced flat-leaf parsley
* 1 Tbsp minced fresh thyme
* 1 Tbsp minced fresh oregano
* 1 tsp minced fresh tarragon (optional)
* Sea salt & freshly ground pepper

Directions

1. Cut the eggplant into cubes. Heat 1/4 cup olive oil in a large sauté pan over high heat until hazy. Add the eggplant and stir to distribute the oil. Cook—reducing the heat if the eggplant threatens to scorch—turning the pieces every few minutes, until golden, about 10 minutes. Set the eggplant aside.

2. While the eggplant cooks, heat the remaining 2 Tbsps of oil in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the onions and peppers and sautée until the onion is lightly browned around the edges—about 10 minutes, adding the garlic and paprika during the last few minutes. Stir in the tomato paste and cook for a few minutes then add the tomatoes and cook for a few minutes more.

3. Add the eggplant, chickpeas, stock, herbs, a teaspoon of salt and a few grinds of black pepper. Lower the heat and simmer, covered, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are cooked through and the flavors are blended—adding water if the stew seems dry—about 30 minutes. Taste, and adjust the seasoning if needed. Serve over quinoa, couscous or rice.

You might also like:



Tomato Soup From Scratch All Winter Long

Saturday, September 3, 2016

Jars of homemade tomato soup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Our record-breaking tomato harvest has already forced inspired me to make two kinds of salsa, tomato sauce, tomato puree, and several batches of roasted tomatoes with garlic and herbs. The shelves of our pantry are starting to sag and the freezer is filling up but each day brings even more bright red orbs. I miss seeing my countertops...

Tomatoes for the tomato soup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Needless to say, I've been frantically searching through all my favorite canning books (that's Food In Jars, Put 'Em Up, Saving the Season and the Ball Book, in case you were curious) for ideas. I also use the interwebs, of course. I got the idea for tomato soup from this site.

Cooking the tomato soup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

I've always loved tomato soup, especially with grilled cheese. As the tomatoes continued to mound up, it seemed like a better and better idea. A shelf filled with jars of my own homemade version of Campbells tomato soup that I could pop open any time a craving struck... Heavenly, right?

Celery for the tomato soup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

So I did it, quadrupling the recipe below. I'm not going to lie to you, between the slicing and the simmering and the straining and the canning, it was a lot of work. But I think it will be well worth the effort when I get to enjoy creamy tomato soup and crispy, melty grilled cheese on cold, gray days this winter.

Simmering the tomatoes until tender by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

I did need two pieces of equipment I don't often use - my food mill and my pressure canner. But if you do not have either one, you can use a sieve (more work and time but the same results) and you can always just freeze the soup rather than canning it - it's a lot easier that way!

Jars of homemade tomato soup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

-- print recipe --
Homemade Tomato Soup
Makes 4 pints

Ingredients

* 8 lbs ripe tomatoes, cored and quartered (you don't need to peel them)
* 1 cup celery, diced
* 2 cups onion, diced
* 4 cloves garlic, pressed or minced
* 6 bay leaves
* 1/2 tsps black pepper
* 2 1/2 Tbsps sea salt
* 1/4 cup cane sugar
* 1 tsp citric acid or 4 Tbsps bottled lemon juice (for canning only)

Directions

1. Place the tomatoes, celery, onion, garlic and bay leaves in a large stainless steel pot and cook gently, uncovered, until tender, stirring as needed. Remove the bay leaves and puree the soup right in the pot, using an immersion blender.

2. Pass the mixture through a food mill or sieve into a large stainless steel pot to remove the skins and seeds (some of the seeds made it through mine but I don't mind them.) If you're planning to can your soup, prepare the canner and sterilize your jars and lids - it can take a while to get all that water boiling.

3. Bring the soup back to a boil, then turn down to a simmer and add the salt and sugar. Reduce the soup until it's thicker than you want it to be when you actually eat it since you will be thinning it with milk or broth. If you're not canning the soup, congratulations, you're done!

4. If you are canning the soup, put the heat on high and let the steam in the pressure canner escape through the vent for 10 minutes to purge the airspace inside the canner. Then put the weight on and let the pressure build to 10 to 15 pounds pressure in a weighted gauge canner or 11 to 13 pounds in a dial-type gauge canner.

5. When you're ready to can, add 1 tablespoon bottled lemon juice or 1/4 teaspoon citric acid to the bottom of each of your sterilized pint jars then ladle the hot soup into the jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Wipe the rims with a clean, wet cloth and place the lids on the jars, then apply the bands and tighten to fingertip tightness. If you want to use quart jars, double the amount of lemon juice or citric acid and process for twice as long.

6. Process pints for 25 minutes in a pressure canner at 10 pounds of pressure for weighted gauge canners and 11 pounds for dial gauge canners. Then turn off the heat and let vent until the canner is cool enough to open, then remove the jars and let cool on a kitchen towel in a draft-free space for 12-24 hours. Remove the bands, test the seals (store any that failed in the fridge and use within a couple of weeks) and store for up to a year.

7. When you're ready to eat the soup, pour it into a pot and heat over a medium flame, thinning with milk, chicken broth or water to your desired consistency. If the soup is too thin, you can make a slurry of a little flour and water to thicken it, stir it in and let it cook for a couple minutes.

You might also like:



Eight Eggplant Recipes You'll Love

Tuesday, August 30, 2016


The eggplants in our garden are ripening on an almost daily basis. It's hard to keep up but this is such a glorious time of year, especially when it comes to food. Here are eight tried and true ways to enjoy eggplant's delicious, nutty, sweet, almost meaty flavor.


Grilled Eggplant Stacks with Tomatoes, Feta & Basil
A delicious way to enjoy fresh tomatoes and eggplant. The stacks are particularly fun for kids -- if yours eat vegetables :)


Thai-Style Eggplant Salad with Scallions, Herbs & Greens
This is one of my favorite ways to enjoy eggplants. The combination of the sweet, nutty roasted eggplant rounds with the zesty lime, spicy sriracha, the scallions, cilantro and greens is complex and divine.


Roasted Eggplant and Tomato Gratin
This is a much easier, lighter version of eggplant Parmesan that I love. You layer slices of nutty, roasted eggplant with tomato sauce and parmesan and bake the whole thing until it's beautifully browned and bubbling.


Pomegranate Roasted Eggplant with Toasted Pecans & Chives
Roasting the eggplant slices with pomegranate molasses turns them into the most amazing little savory candies. Paired with toasted pecans and some chives (cheese is optional), it makes a delicious side.


Ratatouille and Sausage Potpie with Cornmeal Biscuit Topping
The perfect dish for late summer and early fall - sautee eggplants, tomatoes, bell peppers, zucchini and basil with sausage and top with decadent cornmeal biscuits. It's not a quick meal but it's so worth the time. Please forgive the photos - this was before I knew anything about lighting...

Hasselback Eggplant with Pesto and Tomato
This recipe is so wonderfully simple and easy. Although I first made it in the woodstove since it was the dead of winter, you can use either the grill or your oven. Slice an eggplant, brush each slice with olive oil, salt and pepper then smear pesto and tomato paste between each slice, wrap the whole thing in tinfoil and grill or roast until soft and meltingly flavorful.


This is a perfect way to make use of the late summer bounty. Roasted eggplant, summer squash + sungold tomatoes + basil + a blizzard of Parmesan = delicious pasta!


This dip is a Levantine favorite and with good reason. Eggplant's silky, nutty, sweet flavor is amplified by the addition of lemon juice, tahini paste, garlic, and cumin. Baba ghanoush is a wonderful, healthy snack when served with sliced carrots, cucumbers, celery, peppers or pita bread and an essential part of any mezze-style meal.


You might also like:



Monday, September 26, 2016

Summer Stew with Eggplant, Tomato, Peppers and Chickpeas

Summer stew with eggplant, peppers, tomatoes and chickpeas by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Fall is a perfect time to make this lovely, simple summer stew from Deborah Madison's excellent cookbook, Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone. The flavors are fresh and clean. Served over quinoa, it makes a wonderful meal. Healthy, too.

Tomatoes from the garden by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

The second round of tomatoes are ripening right now and the eggplants are still coming strong. There was a chance of frost last night but it didn't get us, thankfully.

Eggplants from the garden by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

There's a bunch of slicing and dicing.

Sauteeing the eggplants by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Followed by a bunch of sautéeing and some simmering. I stuck pretty close to the recipe but added some fresh herbs from our garden - oregano, tarragon and thyme.

Sauteeing onions, garlic, peppers and paprika by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

I served it over some quinoa I cooked in vegetable broth and fluffed with a little butter (makes it extra tasty.)

Quinoa by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

The chickpeas give it a little more substance, making it a perfect vegetarian main dish. Enjoy!

Summer stew with eggplant, peppers, tomatoes and chickpeas by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

-- print recipe --Summer Stew with Eggplant, Tomato, Peppers and Chickpeas
Adapted from Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone
Serves 4-6

Ingredients

* 1 1/2 lbs eggplant
* 6 Tbsps extra-virgin olive oil
* 1 large red onion, diced into 1/2 to 2/3-inch squares
* 1 large red or yellow bell pepper, diced into 2/3- to 3/4-inch squares
* 2 tsps smoked paprika
* 2 plump cloves of garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
* 2 Tbsps tomato paste
* 5 plum tomatoes, diced
* 1 15-oz. can organic chickpeas, drained & rinsed
* 1 cup vegetable stock
* 1/4 cup minced flat-leaf parsley
* 1 Tbsp minced fresh thyme
* 1 Tbsp minced fresh oregano
* 1 tsp minced fresh tarragon (optional)
* Sea salt & freshly ground pepper

Directions

1. Cut the eggplant into cubes. Heat 1/4 cup olive oil in a large sauté pan over high heat until hazy. Add the eggplant and stir to distribute the oil. Cook—reducing the heat if the eggplant threatens to scorch—turning the pieces every few minutes, until golden, about 10 minutes. Set the eggplant aside.

2. While the eggplant cooks, heat the remaining 2 Tbsps of oil in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the onions and peppers and sautée until the onion is lightly browned around the edges—about 10 minutes, adding the garlic and paprika during the last few minutes. Stir in the tomato paste and cook for a few minutes then add the tomatoes and cook for a few minutes more.

3. Add the eggplant, chickpeas, stock, herbs, a teaspoon of salt and a few grinds of black pepper. Lower the heat and simmer, covered, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are cooked through and the flavors are blended—adding water if the stew seems dry—about 30 minutes. Taste, and adjust the seasoning if needed. Serve over quinoa, couscous or rice.

You might also like:



Saturday, September 3, 2016

Tomato Soup From Scratch All Winter Long

Jars of homemade tomato soup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Our record-breaking tomato harvest has already forced inspired me to make two kinds of salsa, tomato sauce, tomato puree, and several batches of roasted tomatoes with garlic and herbs. The shelves of our pantry are starting to sag and the freezer is filling up but each day brings even more bright red orbs. I miss seeing my countertops...

Tomatoes for the tomato soup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

Needless to say, I've been frantically searching through all my favorite canning books (that's Food In Jars, Put 'Em Up, Saving the Season and the Ball Book, in case you were curious) for ideas. I also use the interwebs, of course. I got the idea for tomato soup from this site.

Cooking the tomato soup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

I've always loved tomato soup, especially with grilled cheese. As the tomatoes continued to mound up, it seemed like a better and better idea. A shelf filled with jars of my own homemade version of Campbells tomato soup that I could pop open any time a craving struck... Heavenly, right?

Celery for the tomato soup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

So I did it, quadrupling the recipe below. I'm not going to lie to you, between the slicing and the simmering and the straining and the canning, it was a lot of work. But I think it will be well worth the effort when I get to enjoy creamy tomato soup and crispy, melty grilled cheese on cold, gray days this winter.

Simmering the tomatoes until tender by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

I did need two pieces of equipment I don't often use - my food mill and my pressure canner. But if you do not have either one, you can use a sieve (more work and time but the same results) and you can always just freeze the soup rather than canning it - it's a lot easier that way!

Jars of homemade tomato soup by Eve Fox, the Garden of Eating, copyright 2016

-- print recipe --
Homemade Tomato Soup
Makes 4 pints

Ingredients

* 8 lbs ripe tomatoes, cored and quartered (you don't need to peel them)
* 1 cup celery, diced
* 2 cups onion, diced
* 4 cloves garlic, pressed or minced
* 6 bay leaves
* 1/2 tsps black pepper
* 2 1/2 Tbsps sea salt
* 1/4 cup cane sugar
* 1 tsp citric acid or 4 Tbsps bottled lemon juice (for canning only)

Directions

1. Place the tomatoes, celery, onion, garlic and bay leaves in a large stainless steel pot and cook gently, uncovered, until tender, stirring as needed. Remove the bay leaves and puree the soup right in the pot, using an immersion blender.

2. Pass the mixture through a food mill or sieve into a large stainless steel pot to remove the skins and seeds (some of the seeds made it through mine but I don't mind them.) If you're planning to can your soup, prepare the canner and sterilize your jars and lids - it can take a while to get all that water boiling.

3. Bring the soup back to a boil, then turn down to a simmer and add the salt and sugar. Reduce the soup until it's thicker than you want it to be when you actually eat it since you will be thinning it with milk or broth. If you're not canning the soup, congratulations, you're done!

4. If you are canning the soup, put the heat on high and let the steam in the pressure canner escape through the vent for 10 minutes to purge the airspace inside the canner. Then put the weight on and let the pressure build to 10 to 15 pounds pressure in a weighted gauge canner or 11 to 13 pounds in a dial-type gauge canner.

5. When you're ready to can, add 1 tablespoon bottled lemon juice or 1/4 teaspoon citric acid to the bottom of each of your sterilized pint jars then ladle the hot soup into the jars, leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Wipe the rims with a clean, wet cloth and place the lids on the jars, then apply the bands and tighten to fingertip tightness. If you want to use quart jars, double the amount of lemon juice or citric acid and process for twice as long.

6. Process pints for 25 minutes in a pressure canner at 10 pounds of pressure for weighted gauge canners and 11 pounds for dial gauge canners. Then turn off the heat and let vent until the canner is cool enough to open, then remove the jars and let cool on a kitchen towel in a draft-free space for 12-24 hours. Remove the bands, test the seals (store any that failed in the fridge and use within a couple of weeks) and store for up to a year.

7. When you're ready to eat the soup, pour it into a pot and heat over a medium flame, thinning with milk, chicken broth or water to your desired consistency. If the soup is too thin, you can make a slurry of a little flour and water to thicken it, stir it in and let it cook for a couple minutes.

You might also like:



Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Eight Eggplant Recipes You'll Love


The eggplants in our garden are ripening on an almost daily basis. It's hard to keep up but this is such a glorious time of year, especially when it comes to food. Here are eight tried and true ways to enjoy eggplant's delicious, nutty, sweet, almost meaty flavor.


Grilled Eggplant Stacks with Tomatoes, Feta & Basil
A delicious way to enjoy fresh tomatoes and eggplant. The stacks are particularly fun for kids -- if yours eat vegetables :)


Thai-Style Eggplant Salad with Scallions, Herbs & Greens
This is one of my favorite ways to enjoy eggplants. The combination of the sweet, nutty roasted eggplant rounds with the zesty lime, spicy sriracha, the scallions, cilantro and greens is complex and divine.


Roasted Eggplant and Tomato Gratin
This is a much easier, lighter version of eggplant Parmesan that I love. You layer slices of nutty, roasted eggplant with tomato sauce and parmesan and bake the whole thing until it's beautifully browned and bubbling.


Pomegranate Roasted Eggplant with Toasted Pecans & Chives
Roasting the eggplant slices with pomegranate molasses turns them into the most amazing little savory candies. Paired with toasted pecans and some chives (cheese is optional), it makes a delicious side.


Ratatouille and Sausage Potpie with Cornmeal Biscuit Topping
The perfect dish for late summer and early fall - sautee eggplants, tomatoes, bell peppers, zucchini and basil with sausage and top with decadent cornmeal biscuits. It's not a quick meal but it's so worth the time. Please forgive the photos - this was before I knew anything about lighting...

Hasselback Eggplant with Pesto and Tomato
This recipe is so wonderfully simple and easy. Although I first made it in the woodstove since it was the dead of winter, you can use either the grill or your oven. Slice an eggplant, brush each slice with olive oil, salt and pepper then smear pesto and tomato paste between each slice, wrap the whole thing in tinfoil and grill or roast until soft and meltingly flavorful.


This is a perfect way to make use of the late summer bounty. Roasted eggplant, summer squash + sungold tomatoes + basil + a blizzard of Parmesan = delicious pasta!


This dip is a Levantine favorite and with good reason. Eggplant's silky, nutty, sweet flavor is amplified by the addition of lemon juice, tahini paste, garlic, and cumin. Baba ghanoush is a wonderful, healthy snack when served with sliced carrots, cucumbers, celery, peppers or pita bread and an essential part of any mezze-style meal.


You might also like: